http://hackneystravel.com/wp/wp-content/themes/fullscreen/fullscreen
more

Rightbox

The Hat Man

 

The old man motioned from the dark opening. Come in, he prompted, come here.
Steph called over her shoulder as she crossed the street, “Doug, come on, let’s check it out.”
Click here for the rest of the story: http://www.hackneys.com/travel/ecuador/thehatman.pdf.

This entry was posted in 2008, Americas, Ecuador, Timeline, Travel. Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to The Hat Man

  1. Avery Innis says:

    Can you please revise the Doug & Steph photo that signs off each post with a new one that show’s you both wearing your new hats?

    You’re also lucky, on our recent CDR my fellow riders failed to provide any respect to my Stetson. A cleaning and shaping in Colorado went for naught and the brim was flat by the time we hit Mexico.

    Dirt bike swine .

    Plus, how will the FUSO get to the Galapagos Islands?

    I want to see the rig parked in the midst of hundred of aquatic iguanas.

  2. leslie graney says:

    Picture please!!
    Another great story from a simple hat shop. I like your gut rule, I have a rule like that when it comes to reefing a sailboat. These are good old fashion human survival skills, and they have value in all sorts of ways today, if we learn to slow down and listen. Trust is a popular word in the states today, and it starts in your gut! Thanks for the reminder.

  3. Melody says:

    Congrats on the purchase and the experience of the hat guy 🙂

  4. Bob Gramling says:

    Yegods!Dont know about hats, but that bit about following someone down the alley….
    When I was in AUS I came into the Alice expecting to stay two nights, as this was party city in OZ. Booked into a hotel that had three bars. One for the natives, (aboriginals) one for the workers, and one for the clientele (me) Crossed the line and met ‘MEL’ who was back to work after a week off for a broken arm. In the US, this is eight weeks off. (I need to interject: This hotel had a spiral staircase, brass everywhere, two king size beds totally out of sight of each other, two showers etc. etc. $36 US) Anyway, Mel and I struck up a conversation and I admitted to having booked a ‘dij’ lesson the at the Aboriginal Education Center at Uluru the next day. Mel avowed he could get me better as he knew a pro. We were to go to this guy’s house and do the ‘dij’ thing. “Follow me, mate” Mixed emotions abounding! Visions of a slow trip to China. All for naught. Mel’s mate was indeed a pro recording under a false name (to escape taxes) and had about thiry dijs leaning against the wall. He found one in a true Gmaj and we did Amazing Grace, with Mel on the Guitar, me on the harp, and this amazing musician (who had, evidently, spent a number of years with the natives learning and practicing) on the dij. It was musically good but moreso, it was emotionally inspiring. Had I been just a bit more cautious, I would have missed the whole experience. (sure wish I had that on tape!!)
    I agree with Avery: We need a foto of y’all in them hats! Love, B&B

  5. Scott Brady says:

    One of your best Douglas. Your travelogue is a pure pleasure to read.

  6. Autopsis » Blog Archive » The Hat Photo

  7. Doug says:

    OK, due to overwhelming requests, here’s a shot of me in the hat:

    http://hackneys.com/blog/2008/11/07/the-hat-photo/

  8. John Dawes says:

    Hey, I wanna see Steph in her hat! Send us a pic! 🙂